Lupus and Sjogren’s Syndrome and IVig

My doctor called, “We’ve found out why you have such problems with your balance, walking and weird sensations in your legs. ”

She proposed treating me with either high-dose IV steroids or immunoglobulins because the inflammation and viral activity in my blood was so great. She chose IVig instead of steroids, because steroids would suppress my immune system enough, so that fighting infection would be a problem.

The immunoglobulins would be given to me through an intravenous line. Having learned about immunoglobulins years ago in nursing school, there was no time like the present for a brusher upper! Briefly put, immunoglobulins are proteins found in the blood that are used to fight viruses and bacteria.

Because immunoglobulins are heavy, they require much volume for infusion. Because my doctor needed to know if I could tolerate the volume for the infusion, a right heart catheterization was to be done. In this procedure, a catheter would be placed in my neck, threaded through the heart and lungs and measurements taken in various places of the heart and lungs to help determine if I would be able to tolerate the volume of the immunoglobulins.

So, should steroids be used to treat the lupus and its massive inflammation or immunoglobulins to treat the antibody deficiency? I opted for, and the doctors felt the latter stood a better chance of being effective against the known culprit of Sjogren’s Syndrome. Stay tuned to this channel for the effectiveness of IVig.

 

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