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Do I need a Primary Care Physician?

Many people think that now they are adults, they don’t need a primary care physician; when, in actuality, the important role that this doctor plays can’t be overstated. 

Besides doing your yearly physical, your primary care physician is often your first stop in identifying autoimmune disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome, psoriasis, lupus, thyroid disease, rheumatoid arthritis and more.

Think again if you feel that only children need regular check-ups. Adults need them, too. They need regular visits to their primary care physician or to Los Gatos Doc’s primary care physicians. These visits result in better health care management because during them, you get to know your doctor and vice versa. They also result in better health care management because of the chronicity of autoimmune diseases. Your primary care physician can give you ideas which will result in a better quality of life!

A relationship with your primary care physician often gives both patient and doctor a chance to get to know each other. The relationship becomes special and built on a foundation of trust. Nurture the relationship now because it might be much easier to discuss possibly uncomfortable health issues later if you have developed a bond with your primary care physician. 

Research has shown that people who visit their primary care physicians regularly experience the benefits of better overall health, lower health care costs and have more satisfaction with their health care and lives. It is especially important to discuss how lifestyle changes can have a major effect on autoimmune disorders.

A major benefit of your relationship with a primary care physician is that it’s so much like having your own ‘health care hub’. Other physicians in the practice can access, provide vital information and coordinate all of your care in one place.

Some of the services provided by your primary care physicians can include:

  • Autoimmune disease management
  • Preventative care; disease prevention and screening
  • Checking for hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Checking for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar/diabetes)
  • High cholesterol
  • Checking for cancer
  • Depression
  • STD’s
  • Help manage your chronic conditions
  • Give recommendations
  • Discuss sensitive and private concerns
  • Make referrals to specialists
  • Inoculations
  • Physicals

Your primary care physician is quite knowledgable in all of these areas and many more. Discussing preventative measures and developing strategies for dealing with health issues is one of the biggest reasons for making regular visits to Los Gatos Doc’s family clinic  or to your primary care physician. When we know who you are what your baseline is, we can easier detect changes or patterns which make diagnosing more accurate.

A major advantage of having a primary care physician is in having a team organizer, the hub of a health care wheel. The primary care physician has the ability to identify a patient’s need for a specialist. If you need an allergist and/or a pulmonologist, your primary care physician will point you in the right direction and assist you in understanding what your part might be as you  work together to achieve your health goals. Your primary care physician might also point you towards a rheumatologist who he/she has worked with before, if you need this specialty.

When you go to Los Gatos Doc’s primary care physicians, we treat you as a person and not a disease. If you want to live longer and have better health we are here to advocate for you, to treat you with compassion and to help guide you through your individual health care journey.

About the Author: Arun Villivalam, MD is a concerned and caring family physician and primary care doctor serving the community of Los Gatos, CA. Dr. Villivalam attended Thomas Jefferson University, where he received his medical degree, and completed his residency in family medicine at Cook County Hospital. Dr. Villivalam provides a variety of services to ensure the health and wellbeing of his patients, including physicals for all ages, chronic care management, stress management, urgent care, medicare wellness visits, school physicals and more.

 

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4 tried and true tips for enjoying the season!

Hailey Hudson is a young author, blogger, and freelance writer from the mountains of north Georgia. She loves softball, Harry Potter, and her beagle puppy, Sophie. Click here to buy her debut book and follow along as she pursues her career in writing and children’s ministry by following her blog:

When I was younger, Thanksgiving and Christmas were my favorite times of the year. I loved the parties, the lights; anything and everything associated with the holidays. But two years ago, I was diagnosed with a chronic fatigue illness, and things changed. Many times, I was just too tired to enjoy all the holidays. Through trial and error, I’ve discovered a few tips to help me: I’d like to share them with you with you in the hope that what works for me might help you enjoy the upcoming holidays.

Have an escape plan. You may need to have an escape or a backup plan for the season. Tell everyone that your plans need to be tentative and why: over partying and stress bring flares. Never missing an opportunity to educate, explain why committing to everything can be stressful and how stress affects you.

Or, you may need a backup plan for each event. For example, if I have a party or an activity in the evening, I try to get someone else to drive me, because I know I might be too sleepy to drive when the party ends.

Tell people what to expect Do you need a nap each afternoon? Do you have food sensitivities? Does your medicine need to be taken exactly thirty minutes before a meal? What a tremendous opportunity to educate other people. For example, while assisting the hostess prepare hors d’oeuvres, you can tell her that you’re unable to eat ‘x’  because it affects how a medication that you take, works. Bu, tell her that that won’t affect her because you brought a few things that you can pop into the microwave.

More than likely, people will be happy to accommodate you so you’ll enjoy the festivities. If you’re on a restricted diet and have enough energy, bring food so that you know you’ll have at least a few things to eat.

As much as possible, try to space things out. I do this all year round—if I have an all-day event, I know that I’ll need to rest for the entire next day. So, I try to leapfrog days when I’m planning out my calendar. For example, if I have the option of a holiday party one night and breakfast with a friend the next morning, ideally I would choose only one of those events so that I don’t get too run down. No one will mind if you miss something in order to rest. Give yourself permission to take care of yourself, even if that means sitting out on something fun. You, more than anyone else, knows when your body needs rest. Today’s sniffles could be tomorrow’s full-blown flu without proper care.

Self-care is important—but don’t put it into a box. I spent many evenings forcing myself to take a bubble bath and drink tea and calling it ‘self-care’ because that was what everyone preached—completely disregarding that I disliked both! Finally, I wised up and realized that self-care is not synonymous with a bubble bath—self-care is anything that relaxes you. I began reading and painting in the evenings, and found it much more relaxing than sitting in a tub of water; the water is bound to get cold!

Only you know your body. How you relax is 100% your call, but if you’re like me, in an attempts to be everything to everyone, you’ll forget YOU. So, make sure to make time for whatever relaxes ‘you;’ write it on your calendar if you need to. If you’re not proactively taking care of yourself, you will crash and burn and regret it. I’ve been there and trust me, it’s not pretty!

The bottom line here is this: the holiday season is hectic, but make your health a priority. If you take care of yourself, you will be able to enjoy the holiday, and you’ll love the season and all it has to offer once again. Happy Holidays!


 

 

 

 

 

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LUPUS, in a nutshell

Every disease, everything that ails us, usually has a descriptor, a very easy way of describing it. and here is a lupus descriptor that is a very basic. Future articles will expound on this video:

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Honor Someone Special: Happy Mother’s Day!

honor someone special

Yes, it’s here again, having come around the bend. Not only do we pause and take note of how special Mother’s are in our lives, (Dads, you’ll get your turn), but also Mother’s Day can usher in the beginning of spring weather. It is still a few weeks until the official first day of spring, but already in many areas, there have been occasional bouts of nice weather.

This year, I have a suggestion; “Honor thy Mother” How? Well, send flowers, right? Well, instead of those flowers which might die shortly, consider a gift to the Lupus Foundation of America for research and development, or donate to your local chapter. Donate to the Lupus Foundation of America by  pressing the button below:

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