A book for every library, “The Lupus Encyclopedia”

The Lupus EncyclopediaI received “The Lupus Encyclopedia” for review and was initially a bit overwhelmed by it’s length. But as I turned page after page, I was pleased to read a very well-written and comprehensive book about a very complex topic and any preconceived notion that this was the lupus version of “War and Peace” because of it’s 800-page length, was set aside. “The Lupus Encyclopedia” is carefully-researched, easily-understood and comprehensive book. It is as it claims, an ENCYLCOPEDIA.

In very logical fashion and always with assertions and explanations backed up with facts, Dr. Thomas addresses the very complex topic of lupus and autoimmunity and succeeds, in stellar fashion, in making it understandable. There have been other books written that focus on lupus, but this was more thorough coverage of lupus and discussion of several other major autoimmune diseases. Because autoimmunity is so complex and Dr. Thomas explains it so well, his grade ought to be an A+.

After explaining the structure of the book and suggesting ways to use use it, he begins discussion with an explanation of how lupus received it’s name and proceeds with a chapter on diagnostic tests for lupus. Every topic that you could conceivably have a question about, is covered and indexed well so you can find everything easily.

In reviewing this book, I found that ‘all things lupus’ can fit between the front and back covers of one book: “The Lupus Encyclopedia.” Dr. Thomas has a gift for making the difficult to understand-undestandable. But, there are many areas of lupus and autoimmunity research that aren’t understood; in those areas he does not pretend to know the answers.

There is much discussion of the role of Complementary and Alternative Therapies in the treatment of lupus. He surely did his homework, covering everything lupus.

He gives caregivers advice, talks about how patients can talk to their physicians, gives resources for patients who need assistance, sometimes financial. Dr. Thomas doesn’t just list questions patients ought to ask their doctors, he gives the ‘whys,’ they should ask them and discusses how important it is that to establish a trusting relationship with your physician. He discusses the symptoms patients might look for and how you might monitor them at home. He gives patients suggestions about empowering themselves, how to critically think for themselves; without being their own doctors. Caregivers can learn a lot from this  chapter on “Practical Matters.” If you could can have only have one book in your library about lupus,  “The Lupus Encyclopedia” might well be it.

Hits : 752

Let us all know how bright you are; share your thoughts and shine!